Corporate information

Bajaj Auto Ltd. (the ‘Company’) is a company limited by shares, incorporated and domiciled in India. The Company is engaged in the business of development, manufacturing and distribution of automobiles such as motorcycles, commercial vehicles, electric two-wheelers etc. and parts thereof. The Company sells its products in India as well as in various other global markets. The registered office of the Company is located at Mumbai-Pune Road, Akurdi, Pune 411035.

The standalone financial statements were approved for issue in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors of the Company on 29 April 2021.

1 Summary of significant accounting policies followed by the Company

Basis of preparation

These standalone financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Indian Accounting Standards (Ind AS) notified undersection 133 of the Companies Act, 2013 (‘the Act’) read together with the Companies (Indian Accounting Standards) Rules, 2015, as amended from time to time and other relevant provisions of the Act, on an accrual basis.

The financial statements have been prepared on a historical cost basis, except for certain financial assets and financial liabilities(including derivative instruments) that are measured at fair value or amortised book value.

The financial statements are presented in INR, which is also the Company’s functional currency and all values are rounded to thenearest crore (INR 0,000,000), except when otherwise indicated.

All assets and liabilities, other than deferred tax assets and liabilities, have been classified as current or non current as per theCompany’s normal operating cycle and other criteria set out in the Schedule III (Division II) to the Act. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are classified as non current assets and liabilities. Based on the nature of products and the time between the acquisitionof assets for processing and their realisation in cash and cash equivalents, the Company has ascertained its operating cycleas 12 months for current and non-current classification of assets and liabilities.

Significant accounting policies

This note provides a list of the significant accounting policies adopted in the preparation of these financial statements. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated.

1 Use of estimates, judgments and assumptions

Estimates and assumptions used in the preparation of these financial statements and disclosures made therein are based upon Management’s evaluation of the relevant facts and circumstances as of the date of the financial statements, which may differ from the actual results at a subsequent date. The following are items which are more likely to be materially adjusted due to estimates and assumptions turning out to be different than those originally assessed. Detailed information about each of these estimates is included in the relevant notes together with information about basis of calculation for each affected line item in thefinancial statements:

    1. Estimation of fair value of derivative instruments
    2. Estimation of variable considerations in revenue
    3. Provision for warranties
    4. Provision for employee benefits
    5. Provision for tax expenses
    6. Residual value and useful life of property, plant and intangible assets
    7. Valuation of investments
    8. Inventory provisioning
    9. Provision for bad and doubtful debts

2  Revenue from contracts with customers

Revenue is recognised when control of goods (vehicles or parts) and services have been transferred to the customer; at an amountthat reflects the consideration which the Company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The timing of when the company transfers the goods or provide services may differ from the timing of the customer’s payment. Amounts disclosed as revenue are net of goods and service tax (GST).

The Company has generally concluded that it is the principal in its revenue arrangements, except for the agency services below (in respect of freight), because it typically controls the goods or services before transferring them to the customer.

The disclosures of significant accounting judgments, estimates and assumptions relating to revenue from contracts with customers are provided below.

Sale of goods (vehicles or parts)

The Company has determined that our customers from the sale of goods are generally dealers and distributors. Transfer of control, and therefore revenue recognition, generally corresponds to the date when the goods are made available to the customer, or when the goods are released to the carrier responsible for transporting them to the customer in the following manner:

  • Domestic sales are recognised at the time of dispatch from the point of sale:
  • Export sales are recognised on the date when shipped on board as per terms of sale and are initially recorded at the relevantexchange rate prevailing on the date of the transaction.

Generally, Company does not offer any specific credit period to its customer. All invoices are due immediately after billing.

The nature of contracts of the Company are such that no material part performance obligations would remain unfulfilled at the end ofany accounting period.

Variable consideration

If the consideration in a contract includes a variable amount (like volume rebates/incentives, cash discounts etc.), the Company estimates the amount of consideration to which it will be entitled in exchange for transferring the goods to the customer.The variable consideration is estimated at contract inception and constrained until it is highly probable that a significant revenue reversal in the amount of cumulative revenue recognised will not occur when the associated uncertainty with the variable consideration is subsequently resolved. The estimate of variable consideration for expected future volume rebates/incentives, cash discounts etc. are made on the most likely amount method.

Consideration payable to the customer

Consideration payable to a customer includes cash amounts that the Company pays, or expects to pay, to the customer. The consideration payable to a customer is accounted for as a reduction of the revenue.

Warranty obligations

The Company provides warranties for general repairs of defects as per terms of the contract with ultimate customers. These warranties are considered as assurance type warranties and are accounted for under Ind AS 37- Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets.

Financing component

Generally, the Company receives short term advances from its customers. The Company applies the practical expedient for short-term advances received from customers. That is, the promised amount of consideration is not adjusted for the effects of a significant financing component if the period between the transfer of the promised good or service and the payment is one year or less.

Principal versus agent consideration in respect of freight

The Company, on behalf of its customers (dealers and distributors), dispatches goods to agreed locations for an agreed fee.The Company has determined that the performance obligation of the Company is to arrange for those goods and services(Company is an agent) to the dealers and hence the amount charged to the customer offset by freight charges paid to the freight service providers is shown as revenue and disclosed as other operating income or other operating expenses, depending upon the results of the offsetting.

Contract balances

Trade receivables

A receivable represents the Company’s right to an amount of consideration that is unconditional (i.e., only the passage of time is required before payment of the consideration is due). Refer to accounting policy no. 6 ‘Financial instruments – initial measurement and subsequent measurement’.

Contract liabilities

A contract liability is the obligation to transfer goods to a customer for which the Company has received consideration (or an amount of consideration is due) from the customer. If a customer pays consideration before the Company transfers goods or services to the customer, a contract liability is recognised when the payment is made, or the payment is due (whichever is earlier). Contract liabilities are recognised as revenue when the Company performs under the contract.

Refund liabilities

A refund liability is the obligation to refund some or all the consideration received (or receivable) from the customer and is measured at the amount the Company ultimately expects it will have to return to the customer. The Company updates its estimates of refund liabilities (and the corresponding change in the transaction price) at the end of each reporting period.

3  Property, plant and equipment and depreciation/amortisation

A. Property, plant and equipment

    1. Capital work in progress, property, plant and equipment except land are carried at historical cost of acquisition, construction or manufacturing, as the case may be, less accumulated depreciation and amortisation. Freehold land is carried at cost of acquisition.
    2. Cost represents all expenses directly attributable to bringing the asset to its working condition capable of operating in the manner intended. Such cost includes the cost of replacing part of the plant and equipment, if the recognition criteria are met. When significant parts of plant and equipment are required to be replaced at intervals, the Company depreciates them separately based on their specific useful lives. Likewise, when a major inspection is performed, its cost is recognised in the carrying amount of the plant and equipment as a replacement if the recognition criteria are satisfied. All other repair and maintenance costs are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss as incurred.
    3. Costs incurred to manufacture/construct property, plant and equipment are reduced from the total expense under the head ‘Expenses, included in above items, capitalised’ in the Statement of Profit and Loss.
    4. Land and buildings acquired/constructed, not intended to be used in the operations of the Company and held for earning long-term rental yields or for capital appreciation or both, and that is not occupied by the Company, are categorised as investment property.
    5. An item of property, plant and equipment and any significant part initially recognised is derecognised upon disposal or when no future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal. Any gain or loss arising on derecognition of the asset (calculated as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset) is included in the Statement of Profit and Loss when the asset is derecognised.
    6. The residual values, useful lives and methods of depreciation of property, plant and equipment are reviewed at regular intervals and adjusted prospectively, if appropriate.

    B.  Depreciation and amortisation methods, estimated useful lives and residual value

      (a)  Leasehold land

         Premium on leasehold land is amortised over the period of lease.

      (b)  Other tangible assets

      1. Depreciation is provided on a pro rata basis on straight line method to allocate the cost, net of residual value overthe estimated useful lives of the assets.
      2. Where a significant component (in terms of cost) of an asset has an estimated economic useful life shorter than that of its corresponding asset, the component is depreciated over its shorter life.
      3. The Company, based on technical assessment made by technical expert and Management estimate, depreciates certain items of property, plant and equipment over estimated useful lives which are different from the useful life prescribed in Schedule II to the Companies Act, 2013. The Management believes that these estimated useful livesare realistic and reflect fair approximation of the period over which the assets are likely to be used.
    1.  Assets which are depreciated over useful life/residual value different than those indicated by Schedule II are as under:
      Asset class As per Schedule II Useful life
      Aircraft 20 years 10 years
      PDC Dies 8 years 3 years
    2.  Depreciation on additions is being provided on pro rata basis from the month of such additions.
    3.  Depreciation on assets sold, discarded or demolished during the year is being provided up to the month in which such assets are sold, discarded or demolished.

    4  Intangible assets

    A.  Technical know-how acquired

    Technical know-how acquired is stated at acquisition cost less accumulated amortisation and impairment losses, if any. Acquired technical know-how is amortised equally over a period of estimated useful life.

    B.   Technical know-how developed by the Company

      1. Expenditure incurred by the Company on development of know-how researched, is recognised as an intangible asset, if and only if the future economic benefits attributable to the use of such know-how are probable to flow to the Company and the costs/expenditure can be measured reliably.
      2. Costs incurred to develop an intangible asset are reduced from total expenses and disclosed under the head ‘Expenses, included in above items, capitalised’ in the Statement of Profit and Loss.
      3. The cost of technical know-how developed is amortised equally over its estimated useful life i.e. generally three years from the date of commencement of commercial production.

    C.   Research and development costs

    Research costs are expensed as incurred. Development expenditure on an individual project are recognised as an intangible asset when the Company can demonstrate:

      • The technical feasibility of completing the intangible asset so that the asset will be available for use or sale
      • Its intention to complete and its ability and intention to use or sell the asset
      • How the asset will generate future economic benefits
      • The availability of resources to complete the asset
      • The ability to measure reliably the expenditure during development

    Following initial recognition of the development expenditure as an asset, the asset is carried at cost less any accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses. Amortisation of the asset begins when development is complete, and the asset is available for use. It is amortised over the period of expected future benefit. Amortisation expense is recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss unless such expenditure forms part of carrying value of another asset.

    During the period of development, the asset is tested for impairment annually.

    5  Investment property

    Property which is held for long-term rental yields or for capital appreciation or both, and that is not occupied by the Company, is classified as investment property. Investment property is measured initially at its cost, including related transaction costs. Subsequent expenditure is capitalised to the asset’s carrying amount only when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the expenditure will flow to the Company and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. Repairs and maintenance costs are expensed when incurred.

    Depreciation on investment property is provided on a pro rata basis on straight line method over the estimated useful lives. Useful life of assets, as assessed by the Management, corresponds to those prescribed by Schedule II- Part ‘C’ of the Companies Act, 2013.

    6  Investments and financial asset

    A.  Investment in subsidiaries

    Interest in subsidiaries are recognised at cost. Cost represents amount paid for acquisition of the said investments.

    The Company assesses at the end of each reporting period, if there are any indications that the said investments may be impaired. If so, the Company estimates the recoverable value/amount of the investment and provides for impairment, if any i.e. the deficit in the recoverable value over cost.

    B.  Other investments and financial assets

    i. Classification

    The company classifies its financial assets at initial recognition in the following measurement categories:

    • those to be measured subsequently at fair value (either through other comprehensive income, or through profit or loss), and
    • those to be measured at amortised cost

    The classification is done depending upon the Company’s business model for managing the financial assets and the contractual terms of the cash flows.

    For assets classified as ‘measured at fair value’, gains and losses will either be recorded in profit or loss or other comprehensive income, as elected. For assets classified as ‘measured at amortised cost’, this will depend on the business model and contractual terms of the cash flows.

    ii. Measurement

    Initial Measurement

    Financial assets are classified, at initial recognition, as subsequently measured at amortised cost, fair value through other comprehensive income (FVTOCI), or fair value through profit or loss (FVTPL). The classification of financial assets at initial recognition depends on the financial asset’s contractual cash flow characteristics and the Company’s business model for managing them.

    At initial recognition, the Company measures a financial asset at its fair value including, in the case of ‘a financial asset not at FVTPL’, transaction costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition of the financial asset. Transaction costs of financial assets carried at ‘FVTPL’ are expensed in the Statement of Profit and Loss, when incurred.

    Trade receivables that do not contain a significant financing component or for which the Company has applied the practical expedient are measured at the transaction price determined under Ind AS 115. Refer accounting policy no. 2 ‘Revenue from contracts with customers’.

    For a financial asset to be classified and subsequently measured at amortised cost or FVTOCI (excluding equity instruments which are measured at FVTOCI), it needs to give rise to cash flows that are ‘solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI)’ on the principal amount outstanding. This assessment is referred to as the SPPI test and is performed at an instrument level. Financial assets with cash flows that are not SPPI are classified and measured at FVTPL, irrespective of the business model.

    The Company’s business model for managing financial assets refers to how it manages its financial assets to generate cash flows. The business model determines whether cash flows will result from collecting contractual cash flows, selling the financial assets, or both.

    Subsequent Measurement

    Subsequent measurement of financial assets depends on the Company’s business model for managing the financial asset and the cash flow characteristics of the financial asset. There are three measurement categories into which the Company classifies its financial instruments:

    Subsequently measured at amortised cost:

    A ‘debt instrument’ is measured at the amortised cost if both the following conditions are met:

    a) The asset is held within a business model whose objective is to hold assets for collecting contractual cash flows, and

    b) Contractual terms of the asset give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal amount outstanding.

    Financial assets that are held for collection of contractual cash flows where those cash flows represent SPPI are measured at amortised cost e.g. debentures, bonds, fixed maturity plans, trade receivables etc.

    This category is the most relevant to the Company. After initial measurement, such financial assets are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate (EIR) method. Amortised cost is calculated by taking into account any discount or premium on acquisition and fees or costs that are an integral part of the EIR. Interest income from trade receivables is included in other operating income in the Statement of Profit and Loss; whilst interest income from the remaining financial assets is included in other income in the Statement of Profit and Loss. The losses arising from impairment are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss. A gain or loss on a financial asset that is subsequently measured at amortised cost is recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss when the asset is derecognised or impaired.

    In case of fixed maturity plans (FMP), they are measured at amortised cost, if the Company intends to hold the FMPs to maturity. Further, the Company applies amortised cost for those FMPs where the Company is able to demonstrate that the underlying instruments in the portfolio would fulfill the SPPI test and the churn in the underlying portfolio is negligible. These conditions are assessed at each Balance Sheet date. If these conditions are not fulfilled, then FMPsare valued at FVTPL.

    The Company intends to hold its investment in open ended target maturity funds (i.e. exchange traded funds/ETF) till maturity. It may be noted that these funds have a pre determined maturity date. These funds follow a passive buy and hold strategy; in which the existing underlying investment bonds are expected to be held till maturity unless sold for meeting redemptions or rebalancing requirements as stated in the scheme document. In our view, such strategy mitigates intermittent price volatility in open ended target maturity fund’s underlying investments; and investors who remaininvested until maturity are expected to mitigate the market/volatility risk to a large extent. These funds can invest onlyin plain vanilla INR bonds with fixed coupon and maturity; and cannot invest in floating rate bonds. Based on this, the Company believes that the investments in open ended target maturity funds meet the requirements of SPPI test as per the requirements of Ind AS 109.

    Subsequently measured at FVTOCI:

    All equity investments in scope of Ind AS 109 are measured at fair value. Equity instruments which are held for trading, if any, are classified as at FVTPL. For all other equity instruments, the Company may make an irrevocable election to present in other comprehensive income subsequent changes in the fair value. The Company makes such election on an instrument-by-instrument basis. The classification is made on initial recognition and is irrevocable.

    Equity instruments included within the FVTOCI category are measured initially as well as at each reporting date at fairvalue. Fair value movements are recognised in the other comprehensive income (OCI). If the Company decides to classify an equity instrument as at FVTOCI, then all fair value changes on the instrument, excluding dividends, are recognised in the OCI. There is no recycling of the amounts from OCI to Statement of profit and loss, even on sale of investment. However, the Company may transfer the cumulative gain or loss within equity.

    Subsequently measured at FVTPL:

    Financial assets that do not meet the criteria for amortised cost and FVTOCI are measured at fair value through profit or loss e.g. investments in mutual funds. A gain or loss on a financial asset that is subsequently measured at fair value through profit or loss is recognised in profit or loss and presented net in the Statement of Profit and Loss within other gains/(losses) in the period in which it arises.

    In addition, the Company may elect to designate a debt instrument, which otherwise meets amortised cost or FVTOCI criteria, as at FVTPL. However, such election is allowed only if doing so reduces or eliminates a measurement or recognition inconsistency (referred to as ‘accounting mismatch’). The Company has designated investments in mutualfunds (other than FMP) as at FVTPL. Debt instruments included within the FVTPL category are measured at fair value with all changes recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

    iii. Impairment of financial assets

    The Company assesses on a forward-looking basis, the expected credit losses associated with its financial assets carried at amortised cost for e.g., debt securities, deposits, trade receivables and bank balances; and lease receivables. The impairment methodology applied depends on whether there has been a significant increase in credit risk and if so, assess the need to provide for the same in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

    The Company follows ‘simplified approach’ for recognition of impairment loss allowance on trade receivables and all lease receivables.

    The application of simplified approach does not require the Company to track changes in credit risk. Rather, it recognises impairment loss allowance based on lifetime expected credit losses (ECL) at each reporting date, right from its initial recognition.

    For recognition of impairment loss on other financial assets and risk exposure, the Company determines whether there has been a significant increase in the credit risk since initial recognition. If credit risk has not increased significantly, 12 month ECL is used to provide for impairment loss. However, if credit risk has increased significantly, lifetime ECL is used. If, in a subsequent period, credit quality of the instrument improves such that there is no longer a significantincrease in credit risk since initial recognition, then the entity reverts to recognising impairment loss allowance based on 12-month ECL.

    Lifetime ECL are the expected credit losses resulting from all possible default events over the expected life of a financialinstrument. The 12 month ECL is a portion of the lifetime ECL which results from default events that are possible within 12 months after the reporting date.

    ECL is the difference between all contractual cash flows that are due to the Company in accordance with the contract and all the cash flows that the entity expects to receive (i.e. all cash shortfalls), discounted at the original EIR. When estimating the cash flows, an entity is required to consider all contractual terms of the financial instrument over the expected life of the financial instrument.

    ECL impairment loss allowance (or reversal) recognised during the period is recognised as income/expense in the Statement of Profit and Loss. This amount is reflected under the head ‘other expenses’ in the Statement of Profit and Loss. The Balance Sheet presentation for various financial instruments is described below:

    • Financial assets measured at amortised cost, revenue receivables and lease receivables: ECL is presented as an allowance, i.e. as an integral part of the measurement of those assets in the Balance Sheet. The allowance reduces the net carrying amount. Until the asset meets write-off criteria, the Company does not reduce impairment allowancefrom the gross carrying amount.

    For assessing increase in credit risk and impairment loss, the Company combines financial instruments based on shared credit risk characteristics with the objective of facilitating an analysis that is designed to enable significant increases in credit risk to be identified on a timely basis.

    For debt instruments at fair value through OCI, the Company applies the low credit risk simplification. At every reporting date, the Company evaluates whether the debt instrument is considered to have low credit risk using all reasonable and
    supportable information that is available without undue cost or effort. In making that evaluation, the Company reassesses the internal credit rating of the debt instrument

    However, in certain cases, the Company may also consider a financial asset to be in default when internal or external information indicates that the Company is unlikely to receive the outstanding contractual amounts in full before taking into account any credit enhancements held by the Company. A financial asset is written off when there is no reasonable expectation of recovering the contractual cash flows.

    iv. Derecognition of financial assets

    A financial asset is derecognised only when Company has transferred the rights to receive cash flows from the financial asset or the rights to receive cash flows from the financial asset have expired. Where the entity has transferred an asset, the Company evaluates whether it has transferred substantially all risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset. In such cases, the financial asset is derecognised.

    v. Reclassification of financial assets

    The Company determines classification of financial assets and liabilities on initial recognition. After initial recognition, no reclassification is made for financial assets which are equity instruments and financial liabilities. For financial assets which are debt instruments, a reclassification is made only if there is a change in the business model for managing those assets. Changes to the business model are expected to be infrequent. The Company’s senior management determines change in the business model as a result of external or internal changes which are significant to the Company’s operations. Such changes are evident to external parties. A change in the business model occurs when the Company either begins or ceases to perform an activity that is significant to its operations. If the Company reclassifies financial assets, it applies the reclassification prospectively from the reclassification date which is the first day of the immediatelynext reporting period following the change in business model. The Company does not restate any previously recognised gains, losses (including impairment gains or losses) or interest.

    The Company applies amortised cost, where it has ability to demonstrate that the underlying instruments in the portfolio fulfill the solely payments of principal and interest (‘SPPI’) test and the churn in the portfolio is negligible.

    7  Derivative and hedging activities

    The Company uses derivative financial instruments such as range forward and par forward currency contracts to hedge its foreign currency risks. Such derivative instruments are initially recognised at fair value on the date at which the derivative contract is entered and are subsequently re measured at fair value as at the end of each reporting period. The accounting for subsequent changes in fair value depends on whether the derivative is designated as a hedging instrument, and if so, the nature of the item being hedged, and the type of hedge relationship designated.

    The company documents its risk management objectives and strategy for undertaking various hedge transactions. In terms there of, the company designates their derivatives as hedges of foreign exchange risks associated with the cash flow of highly probable forecast transactions (viz. export sales).

    The full fair value of a hedging derivative is classified as a non-current asset or liability when the remaining maturity of the hedged item is more than 12 months; it is classified as a current asset or liability when the remaining maturity of the hedged item is less than or equal to 12 months.

    Cash flow hedges that qualify for hedge accounting –

    The effective portion of changes in the fair value of derivatives that are designated and qualify as cash flow hedges is recognised in the other comprehensive income in cash flow hedging reserve within equity, limited to the cumulative change in fair value of the hedged item on a present value basis from the inception of the hedge. The gain or loss relating to the ineffective portion is recognised immediately in the Statement of Profit and Loss, within other gains/(losses).

    For hedge accounting, hedges are classified as Cash flow hedges when hedging the exposure to variability in cash flows that is either attributable to a risk associated with a recognised asset or liability or a highly probable forecast transaction or the foreign currency risk in an unrecognised firm commitment.

    When forward contracts are used to hedge forecast transactions, the Company designates them in entirety as the hedging instrument. Any gains or losses arising from changes in the fair value for the effective portion of cash flow hedges is recognised in OCI and later reclassified to profit or loss when the hedge item affects profit or loss.

    Where option contracts are used to hedge forecast transactions, the Company designates intrinsic value of the option contract as hedging instrument.

    Gains or losses relating to the effective portion of the change in intrinsic value of the option contract are recognised in the cash flow hedging reserve within equity. The changes in time value of the option contracts that relate to the hedged items are recognised through other comprehensive income in ‘Costs of hedging reserve’ within equity.

    When a hedging instrument expires, or is sold, or when a hedge no longer meets the criteria for hedge accounting, any cumulative gain or loss existing in equity at that time is recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss. When a forecast transaction is no longer expected to occur, the cumulative gain or loss that was reported in equity is immediately transferred to the Statement of Profit and Loss. When a hedging instrument is unexercised and expires, the cumulative gain or loss is reversed within equity with the corresponding effect to the hedge receivable/payable.

    If the hedge ratio for risk management is no longer optimal, but risk management objectives remain unchanged and hedge continues to qualify for hedge accounting, the hedge relationships are re-balanced so that the hedge ratio aligns. Consequently, hedge ineffectiveness is computed and accounted for in the Statement of Profit and Loss immediately.

    8 Impairment of non-financial assets

    Assets are tested for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. An impairment loss is recognised for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less cost of disposal and value in use. For the purposes of assessing impairment, assets are grouped at the lowest levels for which there are separately identifiable cash inflows which are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets or group of assets (cash-generating units).

    9  Impairment of non-financial assets

    1. Items included in the financial statements are measured using the currency of the primary economic environment in which the Company operates (‘the functional currency’).
    2. On initial recognition, all foreign currency transactions are recorded at the foreign exchange rate on the date of the transaction.
    3. Monetary assets and liabilities in foreign currency outstanding at the close of the financial year are revalorised at the appropriate exchange rates prevailing at the close of the year.
    4. The gain or loss on decrease/increase in reporting currency due to fluctuations in foreign exchange rates, in case of monetary assets and liabilities in foreign currency, are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss.
    5. Fixed assets purchased at liaison offices in foreign exchange are recorded at their historical cost computed with reference to the average rate of foreign exchange remitted to the liaison office.
    6. Non-monetary items that are measured in terms of historical cost in a foreign currency are translated using the exchange rates at the dates of the initial transactions.
    7. In determining the spot exchange rate to use on initial recognition of the related asset, expense or income (or part of it) on the derecognition of a non-monetary asset or non-monetary liability relating to advance consideration, the date of the transaction is the date on which the Company initially recognises the non-monetary asset or non-monetary liability arising from the advance consideration. If there are multiple payments or receipts in advance, the Company determines the transaction date for each payment or receipt of advance consideration.

    10 Inventories

    Cost of inventories have been computed to include all costs of purchases (including materials), cost of conversion and other costs incurred in bringing the inventories to their present location and condition.

    1. Finished stocks of vehicles and auto spare parts and stocks of work-in-progress are valued at cost of manufacturing or net realisable value whichever is lower. Cost is calculated on a weighted average basis.
    2. Stores, packing materials and tools are valued at cost arrived at on a weighted average basis or net realisable value, whichever is lower.
    3. Raw materials and components are valued at cost arrived at on a weighted average basis or net realisable value, whichever is lower.
    4. Inventory of machinery spares and maintenance materials not being material are expensed in the year of purchase.
    5. Goods in transit are stated at actual cost incurred up to the date of Balance Sheet

    Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less estimated costs of completion and the estimated costs necessary to make the sale

    11 Employee benefits

    a) Privilege leave entitlements

    Privilege leave entitlements are recognised as a liability, in the calendar year of rendering of service, as per the rules of the Company. As accumulated leave can be availed and/or encashed at any time during the tenure of employment, subject to terms and conditions of the scheme, the liability is recognised based on an independent actuarial valuation.

    They are therefore measured at the present value of expected future payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the end of the reporting period using the projected unit credit method. The benefits are discounted using the market yields at the end of the reporting period that have terms approximating to the terms of the related obligation. Remeasurements as a result of experience adjustments and changes in actuarial assumptions are recognised in Statement of Profit and Loss.

    b) Gratuity

    Payment for present liability of future payment of gratuity is being made to approved gratuity fund, which fully covers the same under Cash Accumulation Policy and Debt fund of the Life Insurance Corporation of India (LIC) and Bajaj Allianz Life Insurance Company Ltd. (BALIC). However, any deficit in plan assets managed by LIC and BALIC as compared to the liability based on an independent actuarial valuation is recognised as a liability.

    The liability or asset recognised in the Balance Sheet in respect of defined benefit gratuity plans is the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period less the fair value of plan assets. The defined benefit obligation is calculated annually by actuaries using the projected unit credit method in conformity with the principles and manner of computation specified in Ind AS 19.

    Remeasurements, comprising of actuarial gains and losses, the effect of the asset ceiling, excluding amounts included in net interest on the net defined benefit liability and the return on plan assets (excluding amounts included in net interest on the net defined benefit liability), are recognised immediately in the Balance Sheet with a corresponding debit or credit to retained earnings through OCI in the period in which they occur. Remeasurements are not reclassified to profit or loss in subsequent periods.

    The net interest cost is calculated by applying the discount rate to the net balance of the defined benefit obligation and the fair value of plan assets. This cost is included in employee benefit expense in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

    c) Superannuation

    Defined contribution to superannuation fund is being made as per the scheme of the Company and recognised as expense as and when due.

    d) Provident fund contributions are made to Company’s Provident Fund Trust. The contributions are accounted for as defined benefit plans and the contributions are recognised as employee benefit expense when they are due. Deficits, if any, of the fund as compared to liability based on an independent actuarial valuation is to be additionally contributed by the Company and hence recognised as a liability.

    e) Defined contribution to Employees Pension Scheme 1995 is made to Government Provident Fund Authority and recognised as expense as and when due.

    12 Taxation

    1. Current income tax assets and liabilities are measured at the amount expected to be recovered from or paid to the taxation authorities, in accordance with the Income Tax Act, 1961; and the Income Computation and Disclosure Standards prescribed therein. The tax rates and tax laws used to compute the amount are those that are enacted or substantively enacted, at the reporting date.
    2. Current income tax relating to items recognised outside profit or loss is recognised outside profit or loss (either in other comprehensive income or in equity). Current tax items are recognised in correlation to the underlying transaction either in OCI or directly in equity. Management periodically evaluates positions taken in the tax returns with respect to situations in which applicable tax regulations are subject to interpretation and establishes provisions where appropriate.
    3. Deferred tax is provided using the liability method on temporary differences arising between the tax base of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts in the financial statements. Deferred tax is determined using tax rates that have been enacted or substantially enacted by the end of the reporting period and are expected to apply when the related deferred tax asset is realised or the deferred tax liability is settled.

    13  Provisions and contingent liabilities

    The Company creates a provision when there is present obligation as a result of past events and it is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. A disclosure for a contingent liability is made when there is a possible obligation or a present obligation that may, but probably will not, require an outflow of resources. When the likelihood of outflow of resources is remote, no provision or disclosure is made.

    If the effect of the time value of money is material, provisions are discounted using a current pre-tax rate that reflects, when appropriate, the risks specific to the liability. When discounting is used, the increase in the provision due to the passage of time is recognised as a finance cost.

    14 Leases including investment properties

    The Company assesses at contract inception whether a contract is, or contains, a lease. That is, if the contract conveys the right to control the use of an identified asset for a period of time in exchange for consideration

    As a lessee

    a) Right of use assets

    The Company recognises right-of-use assets at the commencement date of the lease (i.e. the date the underlying asset is available for use). Right-of-use assets are measured at cost, less any accumulated depreciation and impairment losses, and adjusted for any remeasurement of lease liabilities. The cost of right-of-use assets includes the amount of lease liabilities recognised, initial direct costs incurred, and lease payments made at or before the commencement date less any lease incentives received. Right-of-use assets are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the shorter of the lease term and the estimated useful lives of the assets.

    If ownership of the leased asset transfers to the Company at the end of the lease term or the cost reflects the exercise of a purchase option, depreciation is calculated using the estimated useful life of the asset.

    The right-of-use assets are also subject to impairment. Refer to note 1 clause 8 for accounting policies on impairment of non-financial assets.

    b) Lease liabilities

    At the commencement date of the lease, the Company recognises lease liabilities measured at the present value of lease payments to be made over the lease term. The lease payments primarily comprise of fixed payments.

    In calculating the present value of lease payments, the Company uses its incremental borrowing rate at the lease commencement date because the interest rate implicit in the lease is not readily determinable. After the commencement date, the amount of lease liabilities is increased to reflect the accretion of interest and reduced for the lease payments made.

    c) Short-term eases and leases of low value assets

    The Company applies the short-term lease recognition exemption to its short-term leases of office spaces and certain equipment (i.e. those leases that have a lease term of 12 months or less from the commencement date and do not contain a purchase option). It also applies the lease of low-value assets recognition exemption to leases of office equipment that are considered to be low value. Lease payments on short-term leases and leases of low-value assets are recognised as expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

    As a lessor

    Leases in which the Company does not transfer substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of an asset are classified as operating leases. Rental income arising is accounted for on a straight-line basis over the lease terms. Initial direct costs incurred in negotiating and arranging an operating lease are added to the carrying amount of the leased asset and recognised over the lease term on the same basis as rental income.

    15 Government grant

    Grants from the Government are recognised at their fair value where there is a reasonable assurance that the grant will be received, and the Company will comply with all attached conditions. Government grants relating to income are deferred and recognised in the profit or loss over the period necessary to match them with the costs that they are intended to compensate and presented within other operating revenue.

    Government grants in the nature of export incentives are accounted for in the period of export of goods if the entitlements can be estimated with reasonable accuracy and conditions precedent to claim are reasonably expected to be fulfilled.

    When loans or similar assistance are provided by Governments or related institutions, with an interest rate below the current applicable market rate, the effect of this favorable interest is regarded as a Government grant. The loan or assistance is initially recognised and measured at fair value and the Government grant is measured as the difference between the initial carrying value of the loan and the proceeds received. The loan is subsequently measured as per the accounting policy applicable to financial liabilities.

    16  Dividends

    Provision is made for any dividend declared, being appropriately authorised and no longer at the discretion of the entity, on or before the end of the reporting period but not distributed at the end of the reporting period.

    17  Cash and cash equivalents

    For presentation in the Statement of Cash Flows, cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand, other short-term, highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.

    18  Earnings per share

    Basic earnings per share is calculated by dividing the net profit or loss for the period attributable to equity shareholders by the weighted average number of equity shares outstanding during the period. Earnings considered in ascertaining the Company’s earnings per share is the net profit for the period. The weighted average number of equity shares outstanding during the period and all periods presented is adjusted for events, such as bonus shares, other than the conversion of potential equity shares that have changed the number of equity shares outstanding without a corresponding change in resources.

    For calculating diluted earnings per share, the net profit or loss for the period attributable to equity shareholders and the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the period is adjusted for the effects of all dilutive potential equity shares.

    19  Segment reporting

    Operating segments are reported in a manner consistent with the internal reporting provided to the Core Management Committee which includes the Managing Director who is the Chief Operating Decision Maker. The Core Management Committee examines performance both from a product as well as from a geographical perspective and has identified two operative reportable segments from which significant risks and rewards are derived viz. Automotive business and Investments.

    20  Fair value measurement

    The Company measures financial instruments, such as, derivatives at fair value at each Balance Sheet date. Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date.

    The fair value measurement is based on the presumption that the transaction to sell the asset or transfer the liability takes place either:

    • In the principal market for the asset or liability, or
    • In the absence of a principal market, in the most advantageous market for the asset or liability.

    The principal or the most advantageous market must be accessible by the Company.

    The fair value of an asset or a liability is measured using the assumptions that market participants would use when pricing theasset or liability, assuming that market participants act in their best economic interest.

    A fair value measurement of a non-financial asset takes into account a market participant’s ability to generate economic benefitsby using the asset in its highest and best use or by selling it to another market participant that would use the asset in its highest and best use.

    The Company uses valuation techniques that are appropriate in the circumstances and for which sufficient data are available to measure fair value, maximising the use of relevant observable inputs and minimising the use of unobservable inputs.

    All assets and liabilities for which fair value is measured or disclosed in the financial statements are categorised within the fair value hierarchy, described as follows, based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement as a whole:

    • Level 1 — Quoted (unadjusted) market prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities
    • Level 2 — Valuation techniques for which the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement is directly or indirectly observable
    • Level 3 — Valuation techniques for which the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement is unobservable.

    The Company has set policies and procedures for both recurring and non-recurring fair value measurement of financial assets, which includes valuation techniques and inputs to use for each case.

    For fair value disclosures, the Company has determined classes of assets and liabilities based on the nature, characteristics and risks of the asset or liability and the level of the fair value hierarchy as explained above.

    This note summarises accounting policy for fair value. Other fair value related disclosures are given in the relevant notes.

    • Disclosures for valuation methods, significant estimates and assumptions (note 1 clause 1)
    • Quantitative disclosures of fair value measurement hierarchy (note 31)
    • Investment properties (note 3)
    • Financial instruments (including those carried at amortised cost) (note 31)

    21 Other Income

    a) Dividends

    Dividends are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss only when the right to receive payment is established, and it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the dividend will flow to the Company and that the amount of the dividend can be measured reliably.

    b) Other income

    The Company recognises income on accrual basis. However, where the ultimate collection of the same lacks reasonable certainty, revenue recognition is postponed to the extent revenue is reasonably certain and can be reliably measured.

    22  Employee stock options

    Certain employees (including senior executives) of the Company receive part of their remuneration in the form of employee stock options (ESOP).

    The cost of equity-settled transactions is determined by the fair value at the date when the grant is made using an appropriatevaluation model. Further details are given in note 41.

    That cost is recognised, together with a corresponding increase in share-based payment reserve in equity, over the period in which the performance and/or service conditions are fulfilled in employee benefits expense. The cumulative expense recognised for equity-settled transactions at each reporting date until the vesting date reflects the extent to which the vesting period has expired and the Company’s best estimate of the number of equity instruments that will ultimately vest. The expense or credit in the Statement of Profit and Loss for a period represents the movement in cumulative expense recognised as at the beginning and end of that period and is recognised in employee benefits expense.

    Service and non-market performance conditions are not taken into account when determining the grant date fair value of ESOPs, but the likelihood of the conditions being met is assessed as part of the Company’s best estimate of the number of equity instruments that will ultimately vest. Market performance conditions are reflected within the grant date fair value. Any other conditions attached to an ESOP, but without an associated service requirement, are considered to be non-vesting conditions. Non-vesting conditions are reflected in the fair value of an ESOP and lead to an immediate expensing of an ESOP unless there are also service and/or performance conditions.

    No expense is recognised for ESOPs that do not ultimately vest because non-market performance and/or service conditions have not been met. Where ESOPs include a market or non-vesting condition, the transactions are treated as vested irrespective of whether the market or non-vesting condition is satisfied, provided that all other performance and/or service conditions are satisfied.

    The dilutive effect of outstanding options is reflected as additional share dilution in the computation of diluted earnings per share.

    23 Treasury shares

    The Company has created an ESOP Trust (the ‘Trust’) for providing share-based payment to its employees. The Company uses the Trust as a vehicle for distributing shares to employees under the Employee Stock Option Scheme. The Trust purchase shares of the Company from the market, for giving shares to employees. The Company treats Trust as its extension and shares held by the Trust are treated as treasury shares.

    Own equity instruments that are re-acquired (treasury shares) are recognised at cost and deducted from other equity. No gain or loss is recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss on the purchase, sale, issue or cancellation of the Company’s own equity instruments. Share options exercised during the reporting period are settled with treasury shares.

    24  Changes in accounting policies and disclosures

    New and amended standards

    Several amendments and interpretations apply for the first time in March 2021, but do not have an impact on the standalone financial statements of the Company. The Company has not early adopted any standards or amendments that have been issued but are not yet effective.